Special moment of pride for country

SCHOOLGIRLS pray at a function held in Mingora on Wednesday to celebrate Nobel Peace Prize for Malala Yousafzai. (Right) Members of civil society watch the prize giving ceremony on<br/>television at the Peshawar Press Club. — Photos by Abdul Majeed Goraya and Shahbaz Butt

SCHOOLGIRLS pray at a function held in Mingora on Wednesday to celebrate Nobel Peace Prize for Malala Yousafzai. (Right) Members of civil society watch the prize giving ceremony on television at the Peshawar Press Club. — Photos by Abdul Majeed Goraya and Shahbaz Butt

PESHAWAR/MINGORA: “Malala Zindabad, Dehshatgardi Murdabad” chanted a gathering which watched live Nobel Peace Prize ceremony from Oslo as Malala Yousafzai and Kailash Satyarthi received their prizes.

The civil society was brought together by two youth Taimur Kamal and Shafi que Gighyani to watch the ceremony at Peshawar Press Club where a beautiful pink and white cake was also cut to celebrate this special moment of pride.

As Malala Yousafzai was seen receiving the Nobel Peace Prize, the crowded hall resounded with clapping and chanting “long live Malala” and “down with terrorism”.

The gathering also expressed its pride as well as respect for Malala with standing ovation.

The gathering also passed a resolution, read out by MPA Jafar Shah, who said that Pakistan Tehreek-i-Insaf and other political parties did not support him in tabling a resolution regarding Malala Yousafzai for getting Nobel Peace Prize and paying her tribute by establishing an educational institution in Swat. However, when the idea was presented the gathering passed it.

Mr Shah said that he felt proud of Malala, the youngest Nobel laureate, as she was from his hometown Swat.

“I have brought my little daughter here so that she also could watch Malala getting her prize. Malala is inspiration for us all,” said Qamar Naseem, who spoke on the occasion.


Civil society criticises govt for ‘not owning’ Malala

Arshad Haroon, a peace activist, said that Malala was a model for all the girls. He said that he was proud of her for raising her voice for peace and education.

Some of the participants showed their disappointment at those who used bad language or looked at Malala with suspicion.

Mukhtiar Bacha, a leader of National Party, said that he really was surprised at those who doubted Malala and what she stood for. “I don’t understand those who call this little girl a CIA agent. Seriously it is ridiculous,” said Mr Bacha.

Rukhshinda Naz, a known women rights activist, said that Malala was not only model for Pakhtun girls but the entire country should be proud of her. She said that since she thought women all over the world were the same and connected so all women of the world owned Malala.

Prof Khadim Hussain said that it was important that the Nobel Peace Prize was shared by a Pakistani and an Indian. It could be a symbolic connection and could be a step towards peace in South Asia, he added.

The gathering celebrated the Nobel Peace Prize awarding ceremony with full enthusiasm but the participants also criticised the federal and provincial government for not owning Malala.SCHOOLGIRLS pray at a function held in Mingora on Wednesday to celebrate Nobel Peace Prize for Malala Yousafzai. (Right) Members of civil society watch the prize giving ceremony on<br/>television at the Peshawar Press Club. — Photos by Abdul Majeed Goraya and Shahbaz Butt

In Swat, a function was held in Mingora, the hometown of Malala Yousafazi, to celebrate the Nobel Peace Prize, which she received in Oslo on Wednesday.

The function was organised by Global Peace Council in collaboration with different civil society organisations at Khpal Kor Model School. Apart from peace volunteers and local elders, a large number of school students also participated in the event.

The organisers distributed sweets among the participants of the event and urged the students to convey the message of 17-yearold rights activist to the entire society.

The organisers also arranged a big screen for the participants to watch live coverage of Nobel Peace Prize awarding ceremony. The hall resounded with clapping on many occasions, particularly when renowned Pashto singer Sardar Ali Takkar sang a song about Malala’s struggle.

Ahmad Shah, president of Global Peace Council and a close friend of Malala’s father Ziauddin Yousafzai, told Dawn that they were seeing happiness on each and every face at the gathering. He said that it was an honour for the entire country that Malala received Nobel Peace Prize at such a young age.

He said that Malala worked for promotion of education when terrorism was on its peak and nobody dared to speak against militants.

“Indeed it is good news for us as usually we hear news about bomb blasts and terrorist activities,” Mr Shah said and added that Malala successfully conveyed the message of peace to the world.

He said that they were hopeful that Malala would continue her struggle for promotion of education. “We will communicate a message to Malala to work for increase in GDP for education in the country,” Mr Shah said.

Salman Khan, a student of class eight, said that it was an honour for the country that Malala received Nobel Peace Prize. All segments of society should join hands for promotion of education, he added.

Share on Google Plus

About hi

.
    Blogger Comment
    Facebook Comment

0 comments:

Post a Comment